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Teen book review by a teen named Julia:

Stone Man and the Trail of Tears is a middle grade historical fiction story that was sent to me by the publisher. This book will be released in exactly one month on October 8th. As the Americans continued to explore the westward areas of the United States, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 allowed the military to take the Native tribe’s land and relocate them- by force if necessary. When twelve-year-old Tsatsi’s village is attacked by soldiers and his family kidnapped, he and his younger sister are on the run. With the help of a white man named Johnny, Tsatsi must become a Cherokee warrior and find the strength to get to Oconaluftee.

I enjoyed how the story accurately conveyed the historical attacks against the Cherokee tribes. Stone Man and the Trail of Tears could be a useful educational tool. I also thought it was extremely important and beneficial how Stone Man and the Trail of Tears proves that not all white men were evil and discriminatory. Johnny took unfathomable risks to protect these two kids, inspiring others to do the same and reach out to those in need. The scenery was wonderful and I loved the action-packed scenes. As sad as the story was, I liked how all the characters were still hopeful and did not give up. We should all have the mentality of these characters. I adored the ending and it warmed my heart!

I highly recommend you read this book!

Title: Stone Man and the Trail of Tears
Author: Charles Suddeth
Publisher: Dancing Lemur Press LLC

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Author Greg Pattridge posted a review of Stone Man and the Trail of Tears on his blog: Always in the Middle. https://gpattridge.com/2019/10/06/stone-man-and-the-trail-of-tears/

 

 

A fast paced story sure to please historical fiction fans.

It’s a dangerous journey for Tsatsi and his sister. At the young age of twelve he has to become the leader and find safety, even though the rest of his family is gone. The two are almost always wet, cold, and hungry.

First person narration is the perfect point of view for the story. Each chapter ends with an enticing surprise or cliffhanger, which in turn keep the pages turning. Renegades, the Calvary, or sickness will for sure spell their doom, unless they can put their trust with the Stone Man.

The fourteen chapters are further divided into titled subsections, making this a good selection for a read aloud. Historical notes about the Trail of Tears are included in the back along with a glossary of words—both ones used in English and Cherokee.

An important story to tell and yes, good people do make life worthwhile.

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After U.S. soldiers attack twelve-year-old Tsatsi’s Cherokee village, his family flees to the Smokey Mountains. Facing storms, flood, and hunger, they’re forced to go where Stone Man, a monstrous giant, is rumored to live. Their journey is a dangerous one. Will Tsatsi find the strength to become a Cherokee warrior? And will they ever find their family again?

Juvenile Fiction: ages 8 to 12: “The story starts off at a frantic pace and doesn’t let up, sure to pull in readers who normally don’t read historical fiction. The ending is perfectly executed.” – Greg Pattridge, Always in the Middle reviews

 

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Review of Stone Man

Teen book review by a teen named Julia:

Stone Man and the Trail of Tears is a middle grade historical fiction story that was sent to me by the publisher. This book will be released in exactly one month on October 8th. As the Americans continued to explore the westward areas of the United States, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 allowed the military to take the Native tribe’s land and relocate them- by force if necessary. When twelve-year-old Tsatsi’s village is attacked by soldiers and his family kidnapped, he and his younger sister are on the run. With the help of a white man named Johnny, Tsatsi must become a Cherokee warrior and find the strength to get to Oconaluftee.

I enjoyed how the story accurately conveyed the historical attacks against the Cherokee tribes. Stone Man and the Trail of Tears could be a useful educational tool. I also thought it was extremely important and beneficial how Stone Man and the Trail of Tears proves that not all white men were evil and discriminatory. Johnny took unfathomable risks to protect these two kids, inspiring others to do the same and reach out to those in need. The scenery was wonderful and I loved the action-packed scenes. As sad as the story was, I liked how all the characters were still hopeful and did not give up. We should all have the mentality of these characters. I adored the ending and it warmed my heart!

I highly recommend you read this book!

Title: Stone Man and the Trail of Tears
Author: Charles Suddeth
Publisher: Dancing Lemur Press LLC
Pages: 162
Series: No
Rating: 5 Stars

 

 

 

 

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Bookworm for Kids: Reviews for children books – from toddlers to teens and everything in between. Author Tonja Drecker’s award-winning book blog reviews Stone Man and the Trail of Tears:

This is a tale which transports readers back into history but in such a way that hits home and leaves a mark.

The Trail of Tears was an awful moment in history, and this is where we meet twelve-year-old Tsatsi. His family has been chased out of their village and runs away in hopes of not being found and slaughtered. The journey is perilous, and Tsatsi, along with his young sister, are separated from their family. Things become much more dire when the younger sister falls ill and is kidnapped by the ‘evil’ Stone Man. Tsatsi, determined to save her, discovers that the rumors surrounding Stone Man might not be all they seem, and there is perhaps hope after all.

From the very first page, there is non-stop action and tension. The author throws Tsatsi and his family into the deadly situation right away and doesn’t let their struggles dampen the entire way through. Although historical, the author does a terrific job and presenting Tsatsi and his sister in a way young readers will easily connect to. Their thoughts, hopes, and dreams might be different than those which modern children face, but in many respects, they are similar too. It’s easy to root for Tstasi and hope the family pulls through unharmed.

While this is an exciting read, there are many more layers added in. Tsatsi is out in the wilderness and needs to overcome some very natural (and dangerous) situations. Survival fans are sure to find several scenes interesting and maybe learn something new along the way. There’s also the historical aspect, which allows young readers a very up close look at this sad historical event. It’s presented in a way young readers will understand and sympathize with, while still holding it very age appropriate. Add the themes of friendship, sibling relationships, and the wonder of seeing past rumors to the truth, and it’s an inspiring mix.

Read Full Post »

Teen book review

Teen book review by a teen named Julia:

Stone Man and the Trail of Tears is a middle grade historical fiction story that was sent to me by the publisher. This book will be released in exactly one month on October 8th. As the Americans continued to explore the westward areas of the United States, the Indian Removal Act of 1830 allowed the military to take the Native tribe’s land and relocate them- by force if necessary. When twelve-year-old Tsatsi’s village is attacked by soldiers and his family kidnapped, he and his younger sister are on the run. With the help of a white man named Johnny, Tsatsi must become a Cherokee warrior and find the strength to get to Oconaluftee.

I enjoyed how the story accurately conveyed the historical attacks against the Cherokee tribes. Stone Man and the Trail of Tears could be a useful educational tool. I also thought it was extremely important and beneficial how Stone Man and the Trail of Tears proves that not all white men were evil and discriminatory. Johnny took unfathomable risks to protect these two kids, inspiring others to do the same and reach out to those in need. The scenery was wonderful and I loved the action-packed scenes. As sad as the story was, I liked how all the characters were still hopeful and did not give up. We should all have the mentality of these characters. I adored the ending and it warmed my heart!

I highly recommend you read this book!

Title: Stone Man and the Trail of Tears
Author: Charles Suddeth
Publisher: Dancing Lemur Press LLC
Pages: 162
Series: No
Rating: 5 Stars

Read Full Post »

Bookworm for Kids: Reviews for children books – from toddlers to teens and everything in between. Author Tonja Drecker’s award-winning book blog reviews Stone Man and the Trail of Tears:

This is a tale which transports readers back into history but in such a way that hits home and leaves a mark.

The Trail of Tears was an awful moment in history, and this is where we meet twelve-year-old Tsatsi. His family has been chased out of their village and runs away in hopes of not being found and slaughtered. The journey is perilous, and Tsatsi, along with his young sister, are separated from their family. Things become much more dire when the younger sister falls ill and is kidnapped by the ‘evil’ Stone Man. Tastsi, determined to save her, discovers that the rumors surrounding Stone Man might not be all they seem, and there is perhaps hope after all.

From the very first page, there is non-stop action and tension. The author throws Tsatsi and his family into the deadly situation right away and doesn’t let their struggles dampen the entire way through. Although historical, the author does a terrific job and presenting Tsatsi and his sister in a way young readers will easily connect to. Their thoughts, hopes, and dreams might be different than those which modern children face, but in many respects, they are similar too. It’s easy to root for Tsatsi and hope the family pulls through unharmed.

While this is an exciting read, there are many more layers added in. Tsatsi is out in the wilderness and needs to overcome some very natural (and dangerous) situations. Survival fans are sure to find several scenes interesting and maybe learn something new along the way. There’s also the historical aspect, which allows young readers a very up close look at this sad historical event. It’s presented in a way young readers will understand and sympathize with, while still holding it very age appropriate. Add the themes of friendship, sibling relationships, and the wonder of seeing past rumors to the truth, and it’s an inspiring mix.

Read Full Post »

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