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This recipe originally calls for corn cooked in wood ashes (lime water) to remove the hulls—then ground into flour. Nowadays you can buy masa harina—the same thing. Results are more like a dumpling than bread.

Ingredients:

3 cups masa harina

2 teaspoons baking powder

½ cup bacon grease

1 cup cooked beans (pinto beans are traditional—others will work)

2 cups water the beans cooked in (bean pot liquor)

Dried cornhusks (or hickory leaves)

Mix masa harina and bacon grease together first. Then add other ingredients. Form into patties and wrap in cornhusks. Steam covered for 45 minutes/when cornhusk pulls away cleanly.

Can also be boiled. Minus the cornhusks, it can be baked or fried.

 

 

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Hike to get creative!

Bannock Recipe

Used by Indians in Canada & American Backpackers

In 2-quart freezer bag

2 cups all-purpose flour

½-teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons baking powder

1-tablespoon sugar

¼ cup powdered milk

Cook that stuff!

  1. Put 1 cup cold water in bag and mix thoroughly (shake, rattle, and roll).
  2. Put into greased (buttered) skillet. Liquid margarine works great.
  3. Cook until brown. You can turn it or hold the top next to a campfire to brown both sides. I always just browned one side.
  4. Pig out – can be used for dessert with butter or strawberries. Without the margarine, it’s almost fat free.

Eights Mask2

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Too good to be bread!

Bannock Recipe

Used by Indians in Canada and backpackers

In 2-quart freezer bag

2 cups all-purpose flour

½-teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons baking powder

1-tablespoon sugar

¼ cup powdered milk

Cook that stuff!

  1. Put 1 cup cold water in bag and mix thoroughly (shake, rattle, and roll).
  2. Put into greased (buttered) skillet. Liquid margarine works great.
  3. Cook until brown. You can turn it or hold the top next to a campfire to brown both sides. I always just browned one side.
  4. Pig out – can be used for dessert with butter or strawberries. Without the margarine, it’s almost fat free.
    Eights Mask2

 

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Bannock Recipe

Bannock Recipe

Used by Indians in Canada, unleavened bread, great for campfires

 

In 2-quart freezer bag

2 cups all-purpose flour

½-teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons baking powder

1-tablespoon sugar

¼ cup powdered milk

 

Cook that stuff!

  1. Put 1 cup cold water in bag and mix thoroughly (shake, rattle, and roll).
  2. Put into greased (buttered) skillet. Liquid margarine works great.
  3. Cook until brown. You can turn it or hold the top next to a campfire to brown both sides. I always just browned one side.
  4. Pig out – can be used for dessert with butter or strawberries. Without the margarine, it’s almost fat free.

Eights Mask2

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I am not a cook and these are not complete recipes, just examples of food the characters from my YA novel, Experiment 38, would’ve been familiar with.

 

The group in this story loved their Durham pizza, especially Carolina Caramelized Onion & Prosciutto Pizza: Pizza Crust, Olive Oil, 1 thinly sliced red Onion, 1/4 cup Brown Sugar, grated Parmesan Cheese, 10 ounces thinly sliced fresh Mozzarella Cheese, 8 slices Prosciutto.

Campfire hot dogs: Emily’s specialty. She skewered them on sticks and slowly roasted them. She would’ve enjoyed Carolina hot dogs—mustard, slaw, chili, and onions.

They preferred Eastern-style barbecue—a whole-hog barbecue. Eastern-style sauce is vinegar- and pepper-based, with no tomato whatsoever.

Dave Burgers: Dave only cooked one thing, but he did it right. Half pound of good hamburger hand formed into a patty & cooked in the flames. Cheese if you have to. On weekends he liked Carolina Burgers—chili, mustard, coleslaw

They also gobbled their Durham-style rise donuts—yeast donuts, often made with sweet potatoes and bourbon glaze.

Tomato gravy: Another Carolina favorite they liked, made with bacon drippings & flour & tomatoes (Of course) make the roux for this simple tomato gravy.

YA thriller, publication TBA

YA thriller, publication TBA

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Fry bread recipe

Fry bread: (powwow food)

3-4 cups all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1 1/2 cups warm water

Oil for frying.

Knead into dough, flatten, deep fat fry.
fry bread2

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In honor of National Soup Month, I submit this recipe for historical purposes only, see warning: I consulted archeological and historical periodicals to assemble this recipe and show what life 50,000 years ago might have been like. Warning, I am not a cook. For safety’s sake (and your taste buds’ sake) consult a food expert before attempting this recipe:

Neanderthal Cattail soup

Ingredients:

Half dozen of cattail flowers, pollen, & roots

Handful of chicory leaves & roots

Handful of dandelion leaves

Wild lentils with husks

Directions:

Heat water in a birch bark tray, being careful to keep it out of direct flames to avoid afire.

Add wild lentils with husks to water, allow husks to dissolve and release the lentils

Peel & pound cattail roots, remove the fibers

Add chicory roots & cattail roots to boiling water

Add chicory leaves & dandelion leaves to boiling water

Finally add cattail flowers & pollen to boiling water

If meat is necessary (Neanderthals ate what they had), add small animals or birds

 

My novel takes place in the present, so you might call this an old (very old) family recipe.

Neanderthals in the 21st century? Neanderthal Protocol, thriller, Musa eBook http://musapublishing.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=7&products_id=443

neanderthalprotocol-200

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