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Pocahontas was a chief’s daughter, but she liked to cook.

Pungnough AKA corncob flour. Make a dough by combining corncob flour and water. The dough was formed into a flat cake and covered with leaves. Next, hot ashes were added on top of the leaves, which baked the cake. Talk about a smart use of resources! The dough could also be formed into balls and boiled as dumplings. [John Smith wrote in his journals that he didn’t like Pungnough] (she is said to be my great…great grandmother, but that is another story)

 

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Pocahontas was a chief’s daughter, but she ate with everyone else.

Hobbenis AKA hopniss or groundnuts (early settlers likened them to turnips) are underground tubers similar to potatoes and cooked the same way. They were common along the east coast and were likely at the first Thanksgiving.

(she is said to be my great…great grandmother, but that is another story)

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Keep the kids busy!

Bannock Recipe

Used by Indians in Canada & American Backpackers. In this age of bread shortages, this recipe can be used at home—mix in a bowl and cook over a stove. The kids might even enjoy helping.

In 2-quart freezer bag

2 cups all-purpose flour

½-teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons baking powder

1-tablespoon sugar

¼ cup powdered milk

Cook that stuff!

  1. Put 1 cup cold water in bag and let sit a couple minutes.
  2. Mix thoroughly (shake, rattle, and roll).
  3. Put into greased (buttered) skillet. Liquid margarine works great.
  4. Cook until brown. You can turn it or hold the top next to a campfire to brown both sides. I just brown one side.
  5. Pig out – can be used for dessert with butter or strawberries. Without the margarine, it’s almost fat free.

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Pocahontas was a chief’s daughter, but she did her share of snacking.

Hog peanuts AKA ground beans—hagiach are similar to peanuts. The underground seeds/beans can be cooked or eaten raw. Roots also used.

(she is said to be my great…great grandmother, but that is another story)

Eloise Butler Wildflower Garden

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Pocahontas was a chief’s daughter, but she did her share of digging up potatoes.

Duck potato aka wild potato AKA Indian potato—woapipen. Grows in swampy area. Eaten raw or cooked like a potato.

(she is said to be my great…great grandmother, but that is another story)

 

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Pocahontas was a chief’s daughter, but she did her share of cooking.

Appone – cornbread. Cornmeal and water was formed into flat patties. Wet leaves (sassafras or cornhusks) were placed around the patty with hot ashes covering the leaves, baking the cornbread. Or could be formed into balls, covered in leaves, and boiled dumpling style.

(she is said to be my great…great grandmother, but that is another story)

 

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Pocahontas was a chief’s daughter, and she liked her treats.

Powcohiscora AKA nut milk—pounded nuts mixed with water and sweetened either with honey or maple/other tree syrup. For an extra special treat, Powcohiscora was added to cooked hominy grits. Hickory nuts were preferred though other nuts such as black walnuts were used.  (she is said to be my great…great grandmother, but that is another story)

 

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