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Posts Tagged ‘Tecumseh’

My hero

March 9, 1768 is the birthday of Tecumseh, greatest of all Shawnee chiefs, possibly the greatest military leader in American history. His name means Crouching Panther—he belonged to the Panther clan, but his name is also a euphemism for shooting star. He was born in the Chillicothe, Ohio vicinity, possibly Old Chillicothe.

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Weep for the fallen

October 5, 1813: Tecumseh announced he would die fighting the Americans at the Battle of the Thames in Ontario. His warriors begged him not to lead, but he refused, saying only a coward would refuse to fight because he was going to die. He fell in battle, no one knows who felled him. Some say his body was buried in secret. Many say he was the greatest military leader North America ever produced. The dreams of the Shawnee people died that day (a few of them, my ancestors). [Tecumseh’s well-used tomahawk]

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You don’t mess with Shawnee warriors! Tecumseh’s crew.

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Coincidence?

This photo is of Gary Hunt, present Chief of the Piqua Shawnee, a descendant of Peter Chartier, 18th century Chief of the Piqua, who settled Shawneetown, Illinois, where my family settled. Gary Hunt bears an uncanny resemblance to Tecumseh, the great Shawnee chief. This may be coincidence.

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Council House of the Kispoko Shawnee on the Hog Greek Reservation, Shawnee Township, Allen County, Ohio. This is Tecumseh’s people, and he no doubt met here. (though not recognized by the federal government, Shawnee still live on the Hog Creek Reservation)

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Rebecca and Tecumseh

Rebecca Galloway taught Tecumseh to speak English. A few years later, 1807, he lost his wife. In 1808, he visited Rebecca and asked her to marry him. She agreed if he would live as a white man, but he was a Chief. He never again married, dying in battle in 1813. The next year, she married a local farmer. She lived until 1876—I like to think that in 1876, Rebecca and Tecumseh were finally together.

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Romantic tragedy





Shawnee Chief Tecumseh didn’t speak English, but in Green County Ohio he befriended James Galloway. James’s daughter Rebecca (1791-1876) taught Tecumseh to read and write English. They fell in love. In 1808, he asked her to marry him. He wanted a Shawnee life, she wanted a white life, they departed. She married a cousin the next year, but he never married again, killed in battle in 1813.

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Tecumseh’s stepbrother

Stephen Ruddell (1768-1845) was kidnapped 1780 from Ruddell’s Station, Licking River, Bourbon County Kentucky. For 17 years he lived as a Shawnee warrior. Interpreting for Tecumseh. He never had a bad thing to say about Tecumseh and later became a minister.

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Today (March 9) is the birthday of the Shawnee chief, Tecumseh (Shooting Star/Crouching Panther), born Chillicothe, Ohio, Kispoko sept, Panther clan. He was a brilliant war leader and politician. He also stopped the Shawnee from torturing people and was famed for his psychic abilities. On the day of his death, he announced he would die and went into battle, saying only a coward would shun battle.

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Death of Tecumseh

Tecumseh, the Shawnee chief, foresaw his death. His warriors begged him to stay off the battlefield. He refused, saying that only a coward would refrain from battle because of dying. The next day, October 5, 1813, at the Battle of the Thames in Ontario, he fell as the Shawnee and British battled the Americans. Many believe as do I that he was the greatest leader ever born in the USA. (though I have some Shawnee blood, so far as I know I am not related)

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