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Draw the reader in. Readers need to identify-with/love/relate-to your character. Then they will keep reading to find out what happens to the character.

What’s your character’s name? Names are important. A name must ring true to your character without drawing attention from the story. With children, be aware of name styles. If your character is 5, some names are no longer in vogue.

What’s your character look like? Size, age, hair, health issues etc. are vital to give the reader a mental image.

How does your character speak? Slowly, bass/treble, formal, uneducated etc. Accent is important, but just give the readers hints about the dialect or slang.

How does your character behave? Emotional, mental, & anger states are important, if only to give the character reasons for their behavior.

How about clothes? Don’t ignore clothes/lack of clothes, as they can give the reader an idea of the character’s appearance.

Gives us the specifics. Giving your character specific interests/likes/dislikes personalizes them, makes then unique.

You must eat. What/where/when does your character like to or have to eat. Food can be regional or it can reflect a child’s whims.

Location? Where your character lives or visits can be important to the story line.

What’s your character’s past? Even if you don’t include the backstory in the manuscript, it can be important to the plot.

Put it together. Once you have built your character, write his/her story.

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Book Signing!

I will be one of the authors:

Indie Author Day

Saturday, October 14, 2017 – 01:00 PM – 04:00 PM

Join us at the South Central Regional Library, Louisville Free Public Library, for a celebration of local Indie authors and learn about IndieLou, the suite of services available from the Library that helps authors create, share, and promote their works. Here’s the event roster:
1-4 PM: Local Author Marketplace (I will be here)
1:30-2:30 PM: Panel discussion with four local authors:
Amy Metz, Tytianna Wells-Smith, Bill Noel, and Atty Eve
3-4 PM: Memoir Writing Workshop by Kimberly Crum, MSW, MFA

South Central

7300 Jefferson Blvd.

Louisville, KY USA` 40219
Phone: 502-964-3515

 

I salute the indigenous people of the New World and their descendants. Never forget the millions who were slaughtered starting in 1492.

 

Note to my Italian friends: I love & respect the Italian people, culture, & language. Viva Verdi! (Italians will understand the last sentence)

 

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Writing science Fiction?

I have a manuscript I call a sci fi thriller. Dream Flyer. Dean receives neurotrophic drugs & dreams of Tesla’s lost papers. Cindy helps him escape. Whose side is she on?

An editor from a large publisher read it & liked it, but he had to reject it because I wrote it like a thriller (which I did).

My question is how do I write science fiction so that it doesn’t read like a thriller? Less action & intrigue, paying more attention to the scientific details? In other words, would I need to explain the science, rather than keep the plot running fast?

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Eighth Mask

BOOK: Louisville author plots ‘Murder on the Cherokee Reservation’

Jun 10 2015

 

By T. E. Lyons

Eighth Mask by Charles Suddeth
(Library Tales Publishing; 317 pgs., $18.99

This Louisville author has already delivered a variety of tales: historical suspense novella “Halloween Kentucky Style,” YA tech thriller “Experiment 38” and now a novel subtitled “Murder on the Cherokee Reservation.”

The story is launched with an apparent (though not certain) murder that becomes a mystery due to its time and location — at the climax of a bawdy-but-spiritual Cherokee tradition called a Booger Dance. The eponymous dancers are masked — so the discovery of a body afterwards leads to questions such as who might have been posing as a dancer merely to have an excuse for a disguise. These questions are asked by the local sheriff’s office, but walls of silence (and what may be worse — surly half-truths and omissions) are what greet the interviewers when the dancers and potential witnesses claim they have the right to keep this matter private within the tribe. Gradually the interactions of the expanding cast of characters resolve into a form that’s familiar to fans of Hitchcock films: the innocent man sent on the run by a false accusation.

Best considered as a quick read with some slow buildup, this is a mystery-adventure that both offers and requires a certain, steady focus. Suddeth establishes his style early on: short chapters that gradually accumulate character and backstory, but are filled with point-of-view detail. The dynamic that’s most typical of today’s thrillers — with splashy sections of exposition that show off the author’s research on the background topic — is here muted, as the past and present of Cherokee customs and beliefs is given out a thimbleful at a time.

Suddeth understands the stars that guide this type of rural and natural mystery-thriller that’s infused with Native American lore and culture clashes: Tony Hillerman was a Mt. Rushmore-quality figure who wrote just this kind of novel. In recent years, Nevada Barr has been a go-to figure of very strong consistency (but with an emphasis on landscape/environment description that verges on travel-writing). Suddeth seems to be a more cautious writer than either of these, as he conveys his plot largely through the methodology of a procedural — albeit with some twists based on personal and cultural conflicts.

It’s surprising that with Suddeth’s experience he feels the need to confirm that the reader is sure of where suspicions are still open. His plot is tight enough that he doesn’t give away too much prematurely — yet he seems very cautious about confirming attributions and roles in accusations and personal clashes. The tight paragraphs are perpetually working to make sure the reader is in a very certain place with the heroes and villains. This is the deal Suddeth seems to make with the reader: I’ll get you involved with the characters at a steady pace — any smoke and mirrors will be in the plot, not the writing style. So the voices of Deputy Sheriff Charlie Yuchalla and murder suspect Lyle Gibbons aren’t as far apart as you might suspect, even as one claims to be merely the catalyst for the actions of a supernatural soul-stealer of Cherokee legend. When action scenes crop up, they move well and convincingly. If you can handle an especially-careful pace as the story proceeds, there’s entertainment here.

 

 

Just Saying

Writing Dialogue

 

When I do character sketches, I include voice:

How do they speak? Soft, deep high-pitched, raspy, fast/slow talker/child’s voice mumble etc.     [just a hint is all that is needed]

Do they speak with an accent? foreign/Southern/educated/teen/child etc. [a little accent goes a long way or the reader might get lost]

Do they speak differently under different circumstances? Happy/sad/scared/bored/angry   [emotion affects speech]

Do they speak differently in different places? School/home/public/work [the vocabulary will also  vary]

What kind of vocabulary do they use? Large/simple/slang/work places terms. [age affects this, too]

 

Use these as you write/edit. Read aloud, try to imitate each character. If a character speaks more than once, Include their voice in a character sketch. When using slang, dialect etc., find a native speaker (E.g. A teen for high school slang), read it aloud to them.

Dialogue is not just voice or sound:

What are your characters doing while speaking? Washing dishes. Hiking, etc. [but use   moderation]

Silence is a form of communication. (AKA the silent treatment) [wife called it passive-aggressive]

If the POV character chooses to think rather than speak, it is a form of dialogue because it  informs the reader the way speech would.

Facial expressions, body language, movements can communicate as much as words.

What is dialogue for?

It either propels the story forward or tells the reader something about the characters. If it doesn’t do either one of these, what is the dialogue for?

Things to forget:

Grammar. Complete sentences.

Answering questions: characters often ignore questions and change the subject, which often tells more than answering the question.

 

Don’t try to write dialogue that is too real-to-life. The reader doesn’t need every huh, um, etc, speakers say. Writing dialogue is a trick to convince the reader the speech is real. When using dialect, a few hints work better than dialogue that is difficult for anyone to read.

Using exclamation points (let your word choice indicate excitement). Using caps for emphasis (use italics).

Read it aloud:

Dialogue needs a rhythm. Angry or scared words need a faster, frantic pace. Conversation or  romance might take a slower, relaxed pace.

People interrupt each other, breaking the rhythm. People are rude to each other.

Beats, tags, or neither?

Beats are actions or gestures that either interrupt or add to the dialogue. Use them occasionally.

Tags should be used ONLY when leaving them out it will confuse the reader. Try to use either  said or asked.

Neither. If it is clear who is speaking, and no action or beat is required, then just dialogue is fine (hard to accomplish with more than 2 speakers).

 

Three Ways of Dealing with Non-dialogue for Intense POV’s

E.g. The character breaks a piece of chocolate candy.

Narrative description: The brown candy broke in his hand, releasing a vanilla scent.

Thought: Brown candy. Vanilla scent. Breaks right in my hand.

Active: He broke the brown candy in his hands, the vanilla scent making him smile.

Mabon

The Autumnal Equinox and beginning of Fall. Mabon is a Celtic word meaning “Great Son,” sometimes associated with the Green Man. This is also Harvest Homecoming, a time to enjoy apples & other fall delights. Also, a time for meditation & reflection on the mystery of life. (as a writer, Mabon/Green Man intrigues me)